Man Who Defrauded Employer By Stealing £260k Only Has To Pay Back £1

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A man who allegedly stole more than £260k from his employer, leaving colleagues without pay for up to five months, has reportedly been told he only needs to pay back £1.

Accountant Darren Carvill stole £262,234.61 from his firm, as reported by Kent Online, allegedly spending more than £150,000 of that sum in one night, which he spent with ten escorts, drinking champagne and taking cocaine.

Magistrates were told £36,000 had since been refunded while a further £45,000 had been returned to Mr Clutch franchises by the banks.

After hearing that he had no assets to speak of, Maidstone Crown Court in Kent ordered that he would only need to pay a nominal £1 fee, The Sun reports, with this amount due within a week. He could however be subject to deductions from future earnings when he leaves prison.

Credit: Facebook
Credit: Facebook

The 38-year-old took the money from car servicing company Mr Clutch. It was revealed in court that he had started sending fake payments to himself after allegedly being bullied at work – he admitted to a total of 18 fraud charges and has been sent down for two and a half years.

Carvill’s sentencing hearing was told he had been bullied for most of his life and suffers very low self-esteem.

The court heard Carvill say that when it became obvious he would be caught, he spent a weekend partying with prostitutes and taking cocaine, claiming he wanted to ‘go out with a bang’.

His barrister, James Ross, said: “He has had a very unhappy life. For most of his life he has been bullied.

“He has suffered from very low self-esteem and social awkwardness. He says he was a good employee and worked long hours and did good work.

“He says his bosses had shown them nothing but kindness. But other than the owners, there was at least one person who subjected him to ridicule and caused a downward spiral.”

Mr Ross also said he had become more and more unhappy at work, using his night life as an escape.

Carvill’s actions almost pushed the company into bankruptcy, with some of his colleagues going without pay for up to five months.

One of the directors of the company, Alfred Abdulla, said that Carvill was a ‘respected and trusted employee’, but that his actions meant that he even had to borrow money from family members to save his business.

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